Fair Processing Notice

Fair Processing

Personal data must be processed in a fair manner – the DPA says that information should be treated as being obtained fairly if it is provided by a person who is legally authorised or required to provide it. Fair Processing means that the practice has to be clear and open with people about how their information is used.

Providing a ‘Privacy Notice’ is a way of stating the practice’s commitment to being transparent and is a part of fair processing, however you also need to consider the effects of processing on the individuals and patients concerned;

  • What information are we collecting?
  • Who collects the data?
  • How is it collected?
  • Why do we collect it?
  • How will we use the data?
  • Who will we share it with?
  • What is the effect on the individuals?
  • If we use it as intended, will it cause individuals to object or complain?

Conducting a Privacy Impact Assessment is an effective way of assessing whether you can safely collect or use patient data according to the DPA and Information Governance requirements.

Data Controllers

Under the Data Protection Act, the data controller is the person or organisation that will decide the purpose and the manner in which any personal data will be processed – they have overall control of the data they collect, and decide how and why it will be processed.

A GP Practice is a data controller for the patient information it collects, and should already have data processing arrangements with third parties (e.g. IT systems providers) to ensure they do not use or access data unlawfully; the data controllers will have ultimate responsibility for the practices’ compliance with the DPA.

Risk Stratification

This is a process to identify and manage patients that are more likely to need secondary care – information is collected in order to assess their ‘Risk Score’ and is sent to NHS organisations to assess and return the results to the GP practice. This is an acceptable way of assessing patients’ needs and prevent ill health, however it is also regarded as a disclosure of personal information, and patients have the option to opt out of any data collection at the practice, and needs to be made clear to them.

Invoice Validations

If a patient has had NHS treatment, their personal information may be shared within a secure and confidential environment to determine which HB/CCG should pay for the treatment received. This means sharing identifiable information such as name, address, date of treatment etc. to enable the billing process.

Partner Organisations

If the practice shares information with any external organisations (within or outside the NHS), then let patients know by listing them. Partner organisations will usually include NHS organisations (hospitals, CCGs, NHS England etc.) other public sectors (Education, Police, Fire etc.) and any other Data Processors that may be carrying out specific project work with the Practice (e.g. Diabetes UK).

Access to Personal Information

The DPA gives patients the right to view any information held about them – the ‘Right of Subject Access’. Explain the process and who to contact. You can find your practice registration number by entering your practice name in the ‘Name’ box at www.ico.org.uk.